fashion industry

fashion industry

Aspects Of Fashion Industry – Choose Your Fashion Merchandising Colleges

Posted on February 15, 2018 in Uncategorized

Fashion industry attracts many young people nowadays not only because it is a rather new profession, but also it is supposed to realize person’s likes in the field of fashion. Besides, it is quite a high-paid profession today. When a young person decides to connect his or her activity with the fashion industry nothing comes to mind except one its aspect – fashion design. Probably, few people actually know that it’s a separate field of fashion industry. In fact, there is a great number of other professions and specialties in fashion including designing clothing, fashion design, fashion marketing, fashion merchandising, etc. The latter doesn’t get worthy attention, but it is very important. Due to merchandising we have fashionable clothes in the shops and stores.

How can one know whether fashion merchandising is the field for him to start work at? Look through the following traits of a potential fashion merchandiser and if at least one point coincides with your way of life, you have all chances to make the career in the field. Do you like to spend your weekend walking through flea markets for the latest retro fashions? Or maybe your friends want to borrow your fashionable shoes and your defiant accessories? If so, maybe you should take a walk down the fashion runway. Being a student in merchandising, you will get an opportunity to learn more about fabrics and textiles. You are also going to study the cultures and subcultures that shape the way people dress.

No doubt, in order to become a professional merchandiser, a great desire and talent for this specialty is not enough. If a person wants to get into this career and have success in it one needs to get the right education and training at first. A fashion merchandising college will be of great help for you. Once you study at a fashion merchandising college you will get an opportunity to learn all the ins and outs of the fashion industry because there one can get a practical experience and build a strong foundation necessary for further working in this field.

A student has the right to choose whether to obtain a two-year Associate in Art degree or a four-year Bachelor of Science degree in the field of fashion. It depends on the kind of a fashion merchandising college you are going to visit. Besides, you are also welcome to unite this education with classes or even a major or minor in a related specialty, for instance, fashion design or fashion marketing. Students in a fashion merchandising college learn how to manufacture, buy, promote, and sell fashion items, beginning from clothing and jewelry to cosmetics and furniture. They also learn about textiles (fabrics and the fibers used to make them).

One should choose his or her future merchandising college very thoroughly. Depending upon the fashion merchandising college you are going to attend a sort of the necessary courses in your degree course will greatly vary. The most preferable courses include subjects like accounting principles, business law, salesmanship, fashion sketching, merchandising math, merchandising, publicity and promotions, fashion development, trend-spotting, and the history of fashion. You are certain to like those subjects, besides, they will give you the fundamental knowledge of the fashion industry.

Studying at a fashion merchandising college is not like studying at any other educational establishment. Many core courses in fashion merchandising are hands-on and involve a great amount of project work. Professors tend to rely more on their life experiences than on textbooks. If you are going to become a student expect to take a lot of field trips and listen to many guest speakers. You may visit a fashion magazine or large clothing company. You might even swing by a fashion show or two.

Having the profession of a fashion merchandiser is very interesting. It involves much communication with other people. When a person gets the job of a fashion merchandiser he or she is going to spend all days long visiting various fashion shows, buying clothing and designs, speaking with designers, overseeing advertising and marketing campaigns necessary for successful selling of your products, and managing the stores within your business network. You are also expected to find yourself negotiating business agreements with manufacturers and suppliers. Besides, you are going to arrange your own store displays. The scope of your activity depends on the size of the business you have as well as on the level of practical work expected of you.

Beginning the fashion merchandising career you should always improve your skills and knowledge of fashion tendencies in the world, and the most important thing you will have to do is to perfect your ability of picking out the next big thing in fashion before anyone else does. This will guarantee your success. This ability carries the foundation of your new knowledge of past fashions and trends. It includes everything you will obtain by attending a fashion merchandising college, but further you should develop this trend adding your own good taste in clothing.

Summing up, it would be necessary to say that the career of a fashion merchandiser cooperates with many different fields of the fashion industry. That’s why if you are searching for a more interesting kind of activity, something that’s more than just designing clothes or visiting fashion shows, fashion merchandising may be your piece of cake. But be very attentive while choosing an appropriate fashion merchandising college, try to use your wisdom in this uneasy task, because it may define your future profession and even you life. You should do your research before entering the fashion merchandising college, and beforehand check whether the school or program you are going to attend is properly accredited.

Fashion Industry Debates What Size Models Should Be

Posted on February 14, 2018 in Uncategorized

“You can’t reason with crazy, you can’t argue with stupid.” Whose quote is this? I saw it as a status on a social networking site. (I’d like to offer credit where credit is due.) Sometimes, we all are guilty of being so sure about something that there was no way anyone could change our mind about a certain topic, but when the situation is reversed and other people are the ones who are acting “crazy” and “stupid”…it’s just frustrating.

This point is mentioned because I’m not trying to “be stupid” and debate something that is supposed to be controversial, but when doing research on one of my topics I thought of that quote as I held myself back from commenting on a popular modeling site. I was less than impressed with what, where and how the argument was going amongst some models, photographers, and some other representatives of the fashion industry. Everyone has their own subjective opinion on the topic of beauty, who should be a model, and their role within the fashion industry. Models come in all shapes, sizes, ethnicities, and experience levels, but when you get a bunch of industry professionals together and watch them chat in an open discussion online regarding Plus Size Models…watch out!

Disregarding the term “Plus Size Model” and just mentioning the topic of “Size” is a heated discussion. Some things are currently facts in the modeling industry:

• It’s not just for “pretty girl” types or “Ken-doll” males.
• It’s not just for the tall and skinny.
• You can be a successful model without being famous.
• Models work for clients and are paid to represent that hired image.
• And EVERYTHING ELSE regarding work ethic, personality, and professionalism is very much the same in the industry no matter what TYPE of model you are.

So, people who argue about the standards of what a REAL model IS should watch what they say as being a FACT that can’t be “argued” with. The bottom line is that the CLIENT or people working on behalf of the client are the ones that HIRE THE MODELS. That is a FACT. Whether it is a Fashion Designer, Corporate Commercial Client, Magazine, Photographer, Advertising Agency, etc… they are just some of the people who decide what type of model that they want. It is THEIR standard of how they want their product seen by the consumer. It is their choice.

If a High Fashion Magazine wants a tall, size Zero model for their editorial spread… that’s their choice. If they don’t attract a large group of consumers to buy their magazine because they alienate a large group of people of size then that’s their loss, too, but it’s their choice to make their brand exclusive of those consumers that are worldly, trendy, and have money to spend on their advertisers. Sometimes they forget that people over size 8 can be worldly, trendy, and have money, too.

Some of those magazines dabble with smaller Plus Sized models, so again, it is still their choice regarding size. They do it for their own reasons, but it has nothing to do with equality in modeling. Modeling is not an “Equal Opportunity Employer”. They are considered contract employees that can usually work for many different clients and are strongly hired on their looks and exposed to physical critique often. There are not too many who care that they work under sometimes harsh conditions, long hours, and no guaranteed 15 minute break or lunch hour, etc. Not many other careers would ever tolerate that intense scrutiny without threats of a lawsuit, but models are exposed to it on a common basis. With that said, there still can be a passion from models that enjoy what they do. Many models have a tendency to weed themselves out of the industry especially when they are not prepared about how the business works, don’t find their niche, or don’t make enough money and become frustrated with the industry.

Above and beyond some questionable conditions that the models are exposed to they still do it and do their personal best. If they don’t, they won’t last long complaining to “the boss”. Modeling is a choice for the individual, so if the good doesn’t outweigh the bad most of the time… maybe it’s not the right career. Models may be the center of attention, but they are not the ones that make significant change in the industry without a client giving them that chance to shine. The same choices hold true for whether or not a Fashion Designer is represented during a Fashion Week by Plus Size Models to show their line of Plus garments on the runway. Heck, many designers don’t even have Plus Size designs. They will hire whoever shows their garments in the best way. Some designers see the consumer demand for larger sizes being represented in fashion, but only a few are truly inspired by designing for this group.

Over the past decades, the industry standards regarding High Fashion modeling sizes have trickled down from size 4/6 down to 0/2. The same decline in size of Plus models from Size 14/16 down to even size 8 shows the same trend that smaller sizes and body angles that photograph well are still sought after. Models are human mannequins, or rather human “hangers”, so it’s their job to sell it. Note: Some designers simply don’t have the creative motivation or talent to develop flattering garments in larger sizes. That’s not their fault if they don’t have the passion to create specific garments fitted to an average to plus sized individual. The artistic eye within the modeling industry can have a distorted view of themselves and the things that they consider flaws in others. Regardless, models of both smaller ends of these size ranges can be hired to represent their clients, but the other left out sizes of plus models and consumers debate this as unfair. I’ve seen their argument, too, and they are just as willing to argue and demand respect, but many Plus Models take it personally when they are overlooked for a smaller model. It can be discouraging for ANY model that believes that they deserved the booking that some other model got. That alone is a common experience that all eventually face, so whether they are Size 2/4/6 or Size 12/14/16… it’s up to the client to interpret what they think represents them the best to the consumer. Nothing personal… it’s business and the bottom line.

Ultimately, modeling is a subjective career choice, so before the industry makes any drastic changes and raises the size range of models that represent them, everyone must treat this industry as a business. Just being a really good MODEL is not easy, so for those that have that talent, they aspire to finding the right work for their career. Yes, there is an artistic element to many parts of the industry, as well as image, character acting and proper posing techniques, etc., but the role of a career as a model is to be “whatever” the role that the client hires them to be. It’s not meant to be a personal insult to you as a person, but rather a lesson in flexibility to go with the flow of what you are hired to do. There are many models that give up or never find their “niche” in the industry, but there’s no need for people within the industry or the general public to “pour salt on an open wound” by making people feel that they aren’t REAL models just because they are not famous or a Size Zero.

If you are ever in a position to comment, judge, or just read about the industry… please be open-minded that it takes all sizes, looks, ethnicities and types to be in this career. The process can be grueling on a person’s self-esteem especially for the long haul as a career choice. Sometimes when you read comments and discussions about some of these industry topics you will see people who are supposed to know what they are talking about because they are models, photographers, etc. themselves. Everyone is entitled to an opinion, but when you see individuals that claim only one way is “right” or one type is “beautiful”… know that “You can’t reason with crazy, you can’t argue with stupid”.


How Social Media Is Driving Sustainability and Ethics in the Fashion Industry

Posted on February 13, 2018 in Uncategorized

The sustainable fashion industry is gathering pace as consumers start to think more about what they buy and try to lessen the impact of their purchases. Part of the reason for the growing success of sustainable and ethical fashion is social media and its ability to educate, share stories about brands, good and bad, alert consumers to the vast amount of choice that is out there, create communities and allow individuals to become key influencers as they to make their views and style choices known to their peers and the brands that they buy from.

Social activism has become a significant force for change and has had particularly notable results with respect to sustainability in the fashion industry. To date Greenpeace’s campaign to detox fashion has attracted over 400,000 supporters. Greenpeace promoted its campaign primarily through social media with an engaging Japanese anime style YouTube video. They also encourage supporters to sign up to their Facebook page and Tweet their support. The campaign has been hugely successful with a number of fashion retailers agreeing to clean up their supply chain including the world’s largest fashion retailer, Zara and the world’s largest jean manufacturer, Levi’s. Greenpeace also encouraged people to send in an Instagram photo with the name of the company that they would like to see detox next for the chance to star in their next campaign.

Labour Behind the Label is a campaigning organisation raising awareness of ethical issues in the fashion industry. Recently it called for Adidas pay US$1.8 million in severance owed to 2,800 workers from its former Indonesia supplier, PT Kizone and attracted over 50,000 supporters. Labour Behind the Label have also instigated a number of other campaigns including a call for brands to ban sandblasted denim by encouraging supporters to, amongst other things post to the brands Facebook page with a link back to the campaign website. This isn’t the first time that Adidas have found themselves a subject of the public’s disagreement expressed through social media. In June 2012, the brand withdrew its shackle trainer when, its debuton their Facebook page (ahead of its market release) prompted comments criticising the design as a symbol of slavery.

In addition to increasing awareness and driving change with regards to bad practices in the fashion industry, social media has also become a positive force in spreading news of companies that are getting in right, making a difference and have a great story to tell. Social Media includes a range of different platforms and networks which are being used to help ethical brands tell their stories. YouTube is perhaps the mostly widely used and for AW13 London Fashion Week, a series of ethical fashion videos were broadcast as part of Estethica before being posted on YouTube where they can be viewed, distributed through other social media and posted in blogs.

The significance of social media to marketers is due to the way that it can drive and accelerate social proofing. Social proof is the way that we validate what is the norm by looking at the behaviour of others. Social media greatly magnifies this process by allowing us access to a much greater number of people to validate ourselves against than most people could experience in the offline world. The strong online communities of influencers and advocates of sustainable and ethical fashion that grow on social media platforms play a key role in this social proofing.

Toms Shoes is just one interesting example of an ethical fashion brand that has managed to bridge the gap between the ethical and mainstream fashion market. Behind this success story is perhaps their ability to tell a good story using social media. Their One day without shoes Campaign encouraged users to spend one day without shoes and to tweet about their experience using the #withoutshoes hash tag. They amplified this message by partnering with AOL asked consumers to help distribute the #withoutshoes messages to over 1,000,000 before the event date and celebrity retweets gave a further boost. Tom shoes have also proved popular with fashion bloggers and on outfit sharing websites but it is difficult to tell if this is partly a cause of effect of their social media popularity, perhaps a bit of both.

Within the various social media platforms are communities made up of people with an interest in a particular subject, their impact however extends well beyond their actual community and the more they interact, the more they grow. There are a number of social media communities that are driving change in consumer habits by encouraging fashionistas to make do and mend, upcycle and wear vintage and second hand clothing. This coupled with a move away from trend led looks to individual style statements is helping to change what is considered cool. Street style photographs, fashion blogs and outfits sharing websites all help to inspire rather than dictate how people should dress and have helped to bring about a democratisation of fashion where consumers have more choice and access to many more brands than those available on the high street. Even the concept of buying less is becoming a topic of much discussion on social media as bloggers take on challenges to look stylish for a week, month or even a year just by wearing limited pieces of clothing or without buying anything new. Perhaps one of the most well known of these challenges is the Uniform Project where one girl pledged to wear a little black dress for 365 days as an exercise in sustainable fashion but there have been many more. Labour Behind the Label also runs a challenge called the six items challenge to help raise both funds and awareness of the issues surrounding ethical practices in the fashion industry.

As the world of social media and fashion 2.0 continues to expand and develop, so too will the ways in which we discover, share, become informed about and consume fashion. Hopefully social media will continue to empower consumers allowing fashion conscious individuals to embrace both style and sustainability and brands to find new models for working that ensure they are practicing and communicating their ethics in the most effective way. Social media has opened up communication and this can only be a good thing in terms of increasing transparency and choice in the fashion industry.